Free Forum Q&A- THE SQUARE, Sundance Audience Award Winning Documentary re Egypt’s revolution(s) JEHANE NOUJAIM, Director KARIM AMER, Producer KHALID ABDALLA, Participant

Written on November 13th, 2013
thesquarelogo  

d? Even more, how have they felt?

 

Aired: 11/10/13

How much do you know about what has taken place in Egypt since the start of 2011? Through the news, we only get a glimpse of the bloodiest battle, an election, or a million man march. At the beginning of August 2013, we witnessed the second president deposed within the space of three years. But what have these events evolved on the ground? Even more, how have they felt?

I saw a film recently that answers some of those questions – not literally. Too much has happened too fast to do that. This is not a look back, not an expert analysis. The documentary, THE SQUARE, puts you in Tahrir Square as revolution swirls around you. From the overthrow of a 30-year dictator, through military rule, and culminating with the forced military removal of the Muslim Brotherhood president in the summer of 2013, the film follows a handful of Egyptian activists as they battle leaders and regimes, and risk their lives to build a new society of conscience.
I have the privilege of speaking with three of the principals involved in the making of the film and the revolution — JEHANE NOUJAIM, Director, KARIM AMER, Producer, and KHALID ABDALLA, participant.
 


How much do you know about what has taken place in Egypt since the start of 2011? Through the news, we only get a glimpse of the bloodiest battle, an election, or a million man march. At the beginning of August 2013, we witnessed the second president deposed within the space of three years. But what have these events evolved on the ground? Even more, how have they felt?

Free Forum Q&A – JAY HARMON, Author of THE SHARK’S PAINTBRUSH: How Nature is Inspiring Innovation

Written on November 5th, 2013
JH-Shark  

 Aired: 11/3/13

 

Nature, imaginative by necessity, has already solved many of the problems we are grappling with. Animals, plants, and microbes are the consummate engineers. They have found what works, what is appropriate, and most important, what lasts here on Earth.

After 3.8 billion years of R&D on this planet, failures are fossils. What surrounds us in the natural world is what has succeeded and survived. So why not learn as much as
we can from what works?

This week’s guest, JAY HARMON is doing just that, translating nature’s lessons and models into technologies that solve problems and perform tasks more elegantly, efficiently, and economically. He’s the author of THE SHARK’S PAINTBRUSH: Biomimicry and How Nature is Inspiring Innovation. I believe biomimicry – a way of looking and working and designing – has enormous potential to save us from ourselves. I find this one of the most exciting developments in the world at this time.

 

www.thesharkspaintbrush.com

www.paxscientific.com

 

 

Free Forum Q&A- ANDREW BACEVICH, author of BREACH OF TRUST: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country

Written on October 7th, 2013

 

breach-bacevich  

 Aired: 10/06/13

 

 

Aired: 10/06/13

What do you feel when at sporting events or other public gatherings crowds join in a call to “support the troops?” If you’re like me, I always have some misgivings. On the simplest level, the gesture seems pretty meaningless. What am I or anyone else in that crowd actually doing to support the troops? And when they add some clichéd phrases about fighting for our freedoms, a voice in my head always asks, “Yeah, how? Where?” In Iraq, Afghanistan, operating a drone that’s flying over Pakistan or Yemen? 

Today’s guest ANDREW BACEVICH has thought long and hard about such things, and has written a series of fairly short, very readable books that pursue questions that too many ignore or pretend don’t matter. 

The United States has been “at war” for more than a decade. Yet as war has become normalized, a gap has widened between America’s soldiers and the society in whose name they fight. For ordinary citizens, as former secretary of defense Robert Gates has acknowledged, armed conflict has become an “abstraction” and military service “something for other people to do.” 

In his latest book, BREACH OF TRUST, Bacevich takes stock of the separation between Americans and their military, tracing its origins to the Vietnam era and exploring its implications, which include a nation with an appetite for war waged at enormous expense by a volunteer army and a huge number of privatecontractors unable to achieve victory.

 

 

Free Forum Q&A – JACOB KORNBLUTH: director of INEQUALITY FOR ALL w/ Robert Reich & HARVEY WASSERMAN: Update on Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant

Written on October 1st, 2013
JK-I4AllHW  

Aired 09/29/13

 

A new documentary film opened Friday 9/27 in 23 cities, including Los Angeles, starring former Labor Secretary in the Clinton Administration, Berkeley professor, best-selling author, and frequent guest on this program, Robert Reich. Titled INEQUALITY FOR ALL, can it do for this “inconvenient truth” what the original did for climate change? My first guest this week will be the film’s director JACOB KORNBLUTH.

Early reviews are positive. It’s got a Rotten Tomatoes score of 93%. Here’s Ken Turan in the LA TIMES: Smart, funny and articulate, Robert Reich is the university professor we all wish we’d had. He’s so accessible and entertaining he takes a subject that sounds soporific and makes it come alive like you wouldn’t believe.

Here’s just a few numbers to remind you how crazy things have gotten:
* In 1978, a typical male worker made $48K, a typical member of the top 1% $393K. In 2010, a typical male worker made $34K – a drop of 30%, while a typical member of the top 1% made $1,101K a gain of 180%.
* In 2013, the richest 400 Americans have more wealth than the bottom 150M.
* And as remarkable as those numbers are, I think the most important number in the film is this one: Consumer spending = 70% of the US economy. (i.e., Middle class = job creators).

The last quarter of the show, we’ll get an important update on the stricken Fukushima nuclear power plant from HARVEY WASSERMAN.

Free Forum Q&A- Philip Caputo, Author of The Longest Road: Overland from Key West to the Arctic Ocean in Search of What Holds America Together

Written on September 24th, 2013
caputo-road  

 Aired: 09/22/13

Standing on an island off the Alaskan coast, PHILIP CAPUTO marveled that Inupiat Eskimo schoolchildren pledge allegiance to the same flag as the children of Cuban immigrants in Key West, six thousand miles away. And a question began to take shape: How does the United States, peopled by every race on earth, remain united?
CAPUTO resolved to drive from the nation’s southernmost point to the northernmost point reachable by road, talking to everyday Americans about their lives.
Fourteen years later, nearing 70, CAPUTO, his wife, and their two dogs drove a truck and an Airstream trailer from Key West, Florida, to Deadhorse, Alaska, covering 16,000 miles. They avoided interstates, and invited conversations with Americans you meet when you avoid interstates. Somewhere in many of those conversations, Caputo would ask two questions: What holds a country as vast and diverse as the United States together? Was it holding together as well as it once did?

 

www.philipcaputo.com