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Listen to the first episode of my podcast series DISRUPTIVE: SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY
disruptivesilver-church

I talk with Pamela Silver and George Church, of Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, about the promise – and the precautions they take – in their work in the revolutionary field of synthetic biology.
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Free Forum Progressive Voices Network on TuneIn
Saturday 6/20 7pmPT/10pmET

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Featured Article

DISRUPTIVE: SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY Pamela Silver & George Church

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I’m excited to offer the first episode of DISRUPTIVE, my new monthly podcast series produced with Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. The mission of the Wyss Institute is to: Transform healthcare, industry, and the environment by emulating the way nature builds, with a focus on technology development and its translation into products and therapies that will have an impact on the world in which we live. Their work is disruptive not only in terms of science but also in how they stretch the usual boundaries of academia.

In this inaugural episode, Wyss core faculty members Pamela Silver and George Church explain how, with today’s technology breakthroughs, modifications to an organism’s genome can be conducted more cheaply, efficiently, and effectively than ever before. Researchers are programming microbes to treat wastewater, generate electricity, manufacture jet fuel, create hemoglobin, and fabricate new drugs. What sounds like science fiction to most of us might be a reality in our lifetimes: the ability to build diagnostic tools that live within our bodies, find ways to eradicate malaria from mosquito lines, or possibly even make genetic improvements in humans that are passed down to future generations. Silver and Church discuss both the high-impact benefits of their work as well as their commitment to the prevention of unintended consequences in this new age of genetic engineering.

http://wyss.harvard.edu/

 

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Free Forum Q&A – RANDY HAYES, ED of Foundation Earth former head of Rainforest Action Network Now working to “ecologize” the economy

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Originally Aired November 2012
RANDY HAYES, described in the Wall Street Journal as “an environmental pit bull,” is a veteran of many high-visibility corporate accountability campaigns and has advocated for the rights of Indigenous peoples. These days the primary work of the founder of RAINFOREST ACTION NETWORK and current Executive Director of FOUNDATION EARTH is rethinking and “ecologizing” the economy.

According to Hayes, “The most important environmental or human rights policy is economic policy. That means changing the very basis of the failed system that created the problem. We need a deep green economy – not a green-washing economy. We must ecologize the economy…To start, we must help under-consumers (the malnourished and wanting) move up to a sustainable level of consumption while we assist over-consumers (the wasteful and indifferent) down. We must protect the remnants of wild nature and allow for damaged land, water, and sky to heal.”

 

http://www.fdnearth.org/staff-2/